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Islam and Christianity: Faith and Contradiction

with Imam Abdullah Antepli & Ellen F. Davis
Online
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 • Wednesday, May 26, 2021 Wednesday, June 2, 2021
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks wrote, “The single greatest antidote to violence is conversation.” This master class explores the power of Islam and Christianity to promote violence and social healing. With the help of ancient scriptural texts as well as contemporary voices within both traditions, we will consider how to engage religious identity in ways that lead to healthy self-criticism and deeper mutual appreciation. 

This is a three-session master class. In the first two sessions, teachers learn from the masters. In the third, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Imam Antepli is an associate professor at Duke Divinity School and at the Sanford School of Public Policy. He has worked on a variety of faith-based humanitarian and relief projects in Myanmar and Malaysia and is founder of the Association of College Muslim Chaplains. He served as the first Muslim chaplain at Duke and Wesleyan University and was the associate director of the Islamic Chaplaincy Program & Interfaith Relations at Hartford Seminary in Connecticut. 

Ellen F. Davis is Amos Ragan Kearns Distinguished Professor of Bible and Practical Theology at Duke Divinity School. The author of eleven books and many articles, her research interests focus on how biblical interpretation bears on the life of faith communities and their response to urgent public issues, particularly the ecological crisis and interfaith relations. Her most recent books are Preaching the Luminous Word and Opening Israel’s Scriptures

Dance & High Tech: History and Practice

with Sydney Skybetter
Online
Friday, April 9, 2021 • Friday, April 16, 2021 Friday, April 23, 2021
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Elements of choreography have influenced developing technologies such as robotics, artificial intelligence, and surveillance systems, and sometimes the results have been unjust. This master class will examine ways choreography might be used to create less blinkered and prejudiced technologies. At the same time, we will also explore how technology can be used in the creation of dance pieces in our classrooms.  

This is a three-session master class. In the first two sessions, teachers learn from the master. In the third, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Sydney Skybetter is a Public Humanities Fellow and Lecturer at Brown University where he researches the problematics of human-computer interfaces and mixed reality systems and is the Founder of the Conference for Research on Choreographic Interfaces. Hailed by Dance Magazine as “One of the most influential people in dance today,” Sydney’s work has been performed at such venues as The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Jacob’s Pillow, and The Joyce Theater. He received his MFA in Choreography from New York University.

Puppet by Lexy Ho-Tai made of various fabrics (turquoise, pink, magenta, yellow) sticking its tongue out, a fuschia cloth background is behind it.

Meet the Artist, Make Some Art

with Lexy Ho-Tai
Online
Thursday, January 28, 2021
5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Enter the lottery here.
Deadline: Tuesday, January 19.

Artist Lexy Ho-Tai believes art is a radical act of resistance and that play is a powerful source of artistic inspiration. In this hour-long special event, you’ll learn about Lexy’s art, visit her studio, and then make some joyful, radical art of your own, using everyday materials. 

Lexy Ho-Tai is a multi-disciplinary artist and educator based in Queens, NY. Her practice explores world-building, accessibility, craft, and play. She disrupts the elitist tendencies of the art world by working in non-traditional art spaces, repurposing discarded materials, collaborating across disciplines, and engaging with diverse audiences. She has a BFA in Fashion Design from Parsons School for Design, and residencies have included Flux Factory, ARoS Museum, Everglades National Park, Museum of Arts and Design, and The Watermill Center.

A.I. Explained

with Lawrence Carin
Online
Friday, January 29, 2021 • Friday, February 5, 2021 • Friday, February 12, 2021
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Applications and nominations no longer being accepted.

Artificial intelligence has been studied for decades, but recently it has made significant progress. Advances in analyzing images and processing language are making an impact in many aspects of life, and that impact is likely to accelerate in the coming years. In this class, using almost no math or statistics, the intuition behind A.I., as well as A.I.’s implications for the future, will be presented in a way that anyone can understand. 

This is a three-session master class. In the first two sessions, teachers learn from the master. In the third, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Lawrence Carin is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and Vice Provost for Research at Duke University. He researches machine learning, artificial intelligence, and applied statistics, and publishes widely, with over 450 peer-reviewed publications. Professor Carin is a Fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers and co-founder of Signal Innovations Group and of Infinia ML. 

Jenna Alden, Bard High School Early College Queens

Julián Altschul, The Brearley School

Debra Amoroso, I.S. 024 Myra S. Barnes

Laura Antunez Rodriguez, Manhattan Bridges High School

Emanuel Anzules, KIPP NYC College Prep High School

Jenni Arcieri, The Caedmon School

Michele Balsam, West End Secondary School

Todd Baran, Brooklyn Secondary School for Collaborative Studies

Evanthia Basias, Hunter College High School

Julia Baskin, Bronxdale High School

Christopher Bertram, Saint Ann’s School

Jared Bezzant, Williamsburg Preparatory School

Melissa Birnbaum, City-As-School High School

Michael Bomwell, Horace Mann School

Michael Bonet, Riverdale/Kingsbridge Academy (Middle School/High School 141)

Beth Bosworth, Saint Ann’s School

Juan Botella, Ethical Culture Fieldston School

Kieran Brennan, Xavier High School

Sibylle Brenner, Grace Church School

Bettina Briccetti, Dream Charter School

Susan Brockman, Stuyvesant High School

Aaron Broudo, Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School

Bill Brown, Harvest Collegiate High School

Jessica Brownstein, The Cinema School

Geoffrey Bryson, The Boerum Hill School For International Studies

David Budde, Urban Assembly School for Criminal Justice

Alana Burgos, Lyons Community School

Emily Burnett, The Caedmon School

Digna Minda Candaza Efondo, Pathways to Graduation at Tenzer

Annette Cantarella, Ethical Culture Fieldston School

Ryan Carey, The Packer Collegiate Institute

Brenda Cartagena, PS 1X The Courtlandt School

Adam Chawansky, Brooklyn Secondary School for Collaborative Studies

Punnie Cheng,East-West School of International Studies

Carla Cherry,Innovation Diploma Plus High School

Cam Clarke, Collegiate School

Martha Clizbe, Millbrook School

Iris Cohen, P.S./M.S. 4 Crotona Park West

Lena Cosentino, College of Staten Island High School for International Studies

James Cottone, PS 6X – The West Farms School

Mike Coughlan, Talent Unlimited High School

Mary Couri, Nelson Mandela School for Social Justice

Rachel Cox, Riverdale Country School

Rebecca Crawford, The Boerum Hill School For International Studies

Vincent Cross, World Journalism Preparatory: A College Board School

Jennifer D’anna, Staten Island Technical High School

Eric Dalio, High School for Public Service: Heroes of Tomorrow

Jessica Dardano, PS 280

AJ Debonis, Regis High School

Caitlin Delphin, Leaders High School (Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders)

John Demeny, St. Bernard’s School

Daniel Denver, The Hewitt School

Ben Dinardo, The Birch Wathen Lenox School

Adrienne DiScipio, PS 230 Doris L. Cohen

Nicole Dixon, East Side Community School

Caitlin Donovan, Hunter College High School

Emily Doscher, Community Health Academy of the Heights

Christopher Dossena, Fox Lane High School

Mel Dreyer, KIPP Washington Heights Middle School

Eleanor Durfee, Leaders High School (Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders)

Elizabeth Eagle, The Packer Collegiate Institute

John Eckels, Horace Mann School

Alex Eng, The Hudson School

Rob Erickson, JHS 54: Booker T. Washington

Stevenson Estimé, Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School

Chirine Faraj, John Bowne High School

Geoff Fisher, The Birch Wathen Lenox School

Rachel Fishkis, Bronx Leadership Academy II High School

Kailyn Fox, High School of Economics and Finance

Kelly Garcia, Manhattan Bridges High School

Laleña Garcia, Manhattan Country School

Francisco Garcia-Quezada, North Rockland High School

Noah Garfinkel, Millennium High School

Tracy Garrison-Feinberg, Brooklyn Prospect Charter School

Amanda Geduld, The Young Women’s Leadership School of the Bronx

Elizabeth Geisewite, Edward R. Murrow High School

Katia Genes, Harvest Collegiate High School

Walter Gern, Stuyvesant High School

Leslie Giegerich, High School for Health Professions and Human Services

Guillermo Giraldo, Saint Ann’s School

Jean Gismervik, Dobbs Ferry Union Free School District

Felicia Giunta, Staten Island Technical High School

Kristine Goldhawk, New Canaan High School

Ava Goodale, Millbrook School

Simone Gordon, Central Park East I

Eliot Greene, Academy of the City Charter School

Michael Guarneiri, Claremont International High School

Michelle Haggerty, Dobbs Ferry High School

Jeffrey Hamilton, Marble Hill School for International Studies

Marisa Harris, Williamsburg Preparatory School

Ilan Harris, Humanities Preparatory Academy

David Harvey, The Dalton School

Kathy Havard, Millbrook School

Lauren Henkel-Lorenz, KIPP Washington Heights Middle School

Catherine Henry, Professional Children’s School

Shana Elizabeth Henry, The James Baldwin School: A School for Expeditionary Learning

Emily Hollyday, West End Secondary School

Jonathan Hull, Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School

Christine Hunkele, Judith S. Kaye High School

Lavonne Hunter, City-As-School High School

Shehtaz Huq, Bronx Preparatory Charter School

Jazmin Jinnah, Academy of the City Charter School

Graham Johnson, Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School (WHEELS)

Todd Johnson, The Packer Collegiate Institute

Deborah Johnson, Frederick Douglass Academy

Laird Jonas, Baruch College Campus High School

Angela Jones, Urban Academy Laboratory High School

John Jones, Edward R. Murrow High School

Lisa Jones, The Cinema School

Charles Jones III, Claremont International High School

Lucas Judson, The Birch Wathen Lenox School

Leah Kaplan, Saint Ann’s School

Jane Karp, Bronxdale High School

Anthony Keene, St. Bernard’s School

Sarah Kieval, West End Secondary School

Abigail Kirchman, The James Baldwin School: A School for Expeditionary Learning

Dee Kittany, Xavier High School

Rebecca Kleinbart, Metropolitan Expeditionary Learning School

Orli Kleiner, Brooklyn Technical High School

Zachary Klurfeld, Manhattan International High School

Andrew Koch, Jefferson County Public Schools

Jenny Krumpus, The Clinton School

Clare Kudera, Hunter College High School

Jeffrey Lacosse, Millbrook School

Tracy LaGrassa, The Bronx High School of Science

Susan Lally, Manhattan Bridges High School

Keira Lapsley, Ethical Culture Fieldston School

Mina Leazer, Urban Assembly Gateway School for Technology

Yeuk Sze Leong, PS 126: Jacob August Riis

Marie Lewis, The James Baldwin School: A School for Expeditionary Learning

Sara Lichtman, JHS 54: Booker T. Washington

Michael Lipkowitz, High School for Environmental Studies

Diana Liu, Brooklyn Technical High School

Elizabeth Lorch, IS 528: Bea Fuller Rodgers School

Jonathan Lowenstein, The Birch Wathen Lenox School

Jana Lucash, Hunter College High School

Michael Luppino, John Dewey High School

Shalewa Mackall, Saint Ann’s School

Sarah Macwright, Millbrook School

Marissa Maggio, Stuyvesant High School

Jordan Mahome, Collegiate School

Bridget Mahoney, High School for Environmental Studies

Bushra Makiya, I.S. X303 Leadership and Community Service Academy

Sarah Manhardt, The Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice

Peri Mason, Bard High School Early College Queens

Sean Mattio, Academy for Young Writers

Crystal McIntyre, The Young Women’s Leadership School of the Bronx

Brenna Mclaughlin, Art and Design High School

Ei Meeker, Brooklyn International High School

Mackenzie Merkel, Rodeph Sholom School

Eisenberg Michael, William Cullen Bryant High School

Robert Michelin, Gotham Professional Arts Academy

Rosemary Mittan, Dobbs Ferry Union Free School District

Michel Mok, P.S./I.S. 137 Rachel Jean Mitchell

Joseph Moll, Central Park East High School

Sarah Moon, Saint Ann’s School

Sonya Mooney, Brooklyn School of Inquiry

Daniel Mozes, Hunter College High School

Ryan Myrie, International High School at Lafayette

Samina Najar, Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Secondary School for Arts and Technology

Suzette Nelson, Clara Barton High School for Health Professions

Brooke Nixon-Friedheim, Long Island City High School

Heather Nordstrom, The Clinton School

Marisol Núñez-García, Williamsburg Preparatory School

Eric Olsen, Staten Island Technical High School

Leah Oppenzato, Elysian Charter School

Joy Otibu, Mott Hall Bronx High School

Claire Pagliaro, School of the Holy Child

Ina Pannell-SaintSurin, PS 261 Philip Livingston

Pamela Papish, Claremont International High School

John Parente, Rodeph Sholom School

Kasumi Parker, Hunter College High School

Aruna Patel, New Visions for Public Schools

Rena Pedaria, International High School at Lafayette

Lindsay Peterson, Millbrook School

Sarah Phipps, Saint Ann’s School

Marjorie Preacely, Nelson Mandela School for Social Justice

David Price, Bard High School Early College Queens

Sara Qatabi, Claremont International High School

Kate Quarfordt, New York City Charter School of the Arts

Jessica Quenzer, Stuyvesant High School

Joshua Ramos, KIPP NYC College Prep High School

Matthew Raphaelson, High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology

Sean Reap, Bedford Stuyvesant Collegiate Charter School

Timothy Ree, Brooklyn Technical High School

Judit Resika, The Browning School

Ana Reyes, Brownsville Collegiate Charter School

Christian Robinson, The Berkeley Carroll School

Yanira Roman, Manhattan International High School

Chastidy Román, Trinity School

Gloria Rosario-Wallace, N.Y.C. D.O.E.

Dassi Rosenkrantz, Ramaz Middle School

Tim Ross, Claremont International High School

Julianna Rubbins-Breen, Math, Engineering, and Science Academy Charter High School (MESA)

Katie Rust, Compass Charter School

Isabella Ruston, North Star Academy Vailsburg Middle School

Providence Ryan, West End Secondary School

Emmanuel Saldana, Brunswick School

Christopher Salvato, Urban Assembly Gateway School for Technology

Joselyn Sanchez Gamboa, Hyde Leadership Charter School

Lourdes Santos, Learning Through Play Pre-K Center

Rebecca Sarto, PS 130: The Parkside School

Bradley Scalise, Hunter College High School

Ian Scheffler, Fordham High School for the Arts

Matt Scheiner, Frank Sinatra School of The Arts High School

Emily Schmidt, The Bronx High School of Science

Judith Seidel, Friends Seminary

Anne Servillo, Jamaica Gateway to the Sciences

Anjali Shah, Ridgewood High School

Carla Shane, Learning Through Play Pre-K Center

Colleen Shea, Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

Marvin Siegfried, John Dewey High School

Maxime Sinal, Xavier High School

Marsha Sinanan, Long Island City High School

Thomas Smolka, NYC iSchool

Monica Snavely, Brooklyn Waldorf School

Anna Solovyeva, Harvest Collegiate High School

Pedro Soto, Satellite Academy High School

Martha St. Jean, JHS 88: Peter Rouget

Jennifer Stalec, Eleanor Roosevelt High School

Jacob Stebel, The Cinema School

Matt Steiniger, School of the Future

Michael Stivers, Millennium Brooklyn High School

Amy Strassler, NYC iSchool

Duane Sykes, Jamaica Gateway to the Sciences

Carolyn Tacey, MS 243: Center School

Joseph Tadros, Hillside Arts & Letters Academy

Daniel Fergus Tamulonis, Bronx Charter Schools for Better Learning

Diane Thole, School of the Future

Liz Titone, The Packer Collegiate Institute

Shaina Trapedo, Manhattan High School for Girls

Tanya Traykovski, The Birch Wathen Lenox School

Lawrence Tsao, Academy of the City Charter School

Lucy Turner, The Hill School

Scott Underriner, School of the Future

Rosalie Uyola, Harrison High School

Juliet Varnedoe, Williamsburg Preparatory School

Hemanth Venkataraman, Unity Prep Charter School

Nicholas Verga, Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School

Andy Vernon-Jones, The Brearley School

Adam Virzi, Brooklyn Technical High School

Miriam Walden, The Hewitt School

Calvin Walds, Little Red Schoolhouse & Elisabeth Irwin High School

Devin Walsh, Riverdale/Kingsbridge Academy (Middle School/High School 141)

Arri Weeks, New Canaan High School

Mary Whittemore, Beacon High School

Michele Whittmore, School of the Future

Terrecia Williams, Bronx Leadership Academy II High School

Khaliah Williams, The Berkeley Carroll School

Dara Winkler, Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Secondary School for Arts and Technology

Mary Anne Woody, Xavier High School

Brook Zelcer, Northern Valley Reg HS at Old Tappan

Headshot of Richard Haass in front of a white building.

Nationalism, Regionalism, and Migration

with Richard Haass
Online
Tuesday, January 5, 2021 • Thursday, January 14, 2021 • Thursday, January 21, 2021
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Applications & nominations are now closed.

We will examine the forces that move, and restrain the movement, of populations, with particular emphasis to the historical, political, economic, and other causes that led to the immense diversity we find in our classrooms today. Richard Haass’s book The World: A Brief Introduction is required reading for this class.

In the first two sessions of this three-session master class, teachers will learn from the master. In the third, teachers will have a rare opportunity to exchange ideas with their brilliant colleagues.

Dr. Richard Haass is the president of the Council on Foreign Relations. In addition to service in the Departments of State and Defense, he has been a legislative aide in the U.S. Senate, special assistant to President George H.W. Bush, senior director for Near East and South Asian affairs for the National Security Council, chair of the multiparty negotiations in Northern Ireland, principal advisor to Secretary of State Colin Powell, U.S. coordinator for policy toward the future of Afghanistan, U.S. envoy to the Northern Ireland peace process, and a member of the faculty of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. The recipient of a Presidential Citizens Medal, the Tipperary International Peace Award, and multiple honorary degrees, Dr. Haass is also the author of many books on foreign policy, including, most recently, The World: A Brief Introduction.

An open book with words on the left-hand page sits between the roots of a tree with red and orange leaves on the ground around it.

Pandemic Poetry & Prose

with Academy Fellows
Online
Friday, December 4, 2020
5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Registration is closed.

Join us for an extraordinary hour of Academy Fellows reading their work.

Hosted by the world-renowned poet Danny Shot, formerly of Brooklyn Technical High School.

Bring your own beer, Diet Coke, or skim milk! Toast your fellow teachers!

Claudius’s Soliloquy: What We Can Learn from Hamlet’s Villain

with Ramie Targoff
Online
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 • Wednesday, February 10, 2021
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Apply or nominate a worthy colleague here.

Deadline: January 19.

This master class will focus on a single extraordinary scene in Shakespeare’s Hamlet when the guilt-ridden Claudius confesses his crime and struggles to pray. What does this soliloquy tell us about Claudius’s tortured inner self? And what does it mean that Hamlet misreads what he sees happening before him?

This is a two-session master class. In the first session, teachers learn from the master. In the second, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Ramie Targoff is professor of English, co-chair of Italian Studies, and Director of the Mandel Center for the Humanities at Brandeis University.  She is the author of Common Prayer, John Donne, Body and Soul, and Posthumous Love, and Renaissance Woman: The Life of Vittoria Colonna.  She recently completed a translation of Vittoria Colonna’s 1538 Rime, the first book of poems ever published by a woman in Italy. Targoff is the recipient of fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and she has been a Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome. Her latest project, Shakespeare’s Sisters—a group biography of four women writers in Renaissance England, will be published in 2022.

Native Maps & Colonial Maps: Whose World Is It?

with Aisling Roche, Academy of Urban Planning
Online
Thursday, December 3, 2020
5 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

Registration is closed.

This workshop will look at the differences between Native maps and colonial maps and consider what maps have to tell us about bias, power, and perspective. It will be of interest to any educator wanting to know more about Native histories in the United States. 

Aisling Roche is a Fulbright Teacher at the Academy of Urban Planning in Brooklyn. She teaches in the math and special education departments, and in her 15 years in education has worked with thousands of students. She holds a dual B.A. in English Language and Literature and Cinema and Media Studies from the University of Chicago and an M.Ed. from Long Island University. This workshop grew out of a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, “Discovering Native Histories along the Lewis and Clark Trail.” 

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