American history

Imaging Social Protests

with Deborah Willis
Online
Tuesday, December 7, 2020 • Monday, December 14, 2020
5 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
Apply or nominate a worthy colleague here.

Deadline: November 10, 2020.

We will survey historic and contemporary images, mostly photographic, which document the influential leaders and events of the civil rights movement of the 20th century to social protests of the 21st century. These images were intended to promote racial justice, end segregation, establish voting rights, and call attention to injustices within Black communities in the United States and South Africa.

This is a two-session master class. In the first session, teachers learn from the master. In the second, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Deborah Willis is professor and chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, where she teaches photography & imaging, iconicity, and cultural histories. The recipient of a MacArthur and a Guggenheim Fellowship, Willis is the author of Posing Beauty: African American Images from the 1890s to the Present, and co-author of The Black Female Body A Photographic History; Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery; and Michelle Obama: The First Lady in Photographs. She has appeared in and consulted on media projects including the documentary Through A Lens Darkly and Question Bridge: Black Males, which received the ICP Infinity Award 2015, and American Photography, a PBS documentary. 

Image of Christian Crouch

Slavery & Native Americans

with Christian Crouch
Online
Tuesday, November 17, 2020 • Tuesday, November 24, 2020
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Apply or nominate a worthy colleague here.

Deadline: October 27, 2020.

Colonial and nineteenth-century Native/Indigenous history and Black history are often taught as separate topics, with the former placed outside the frame of U.S. national development and the latter considered overwhelmingly in terms of slavery in the antebellum Cotton Kingdom. This class offers a chance to consider the entwined themes of race and dispossession in the North, not the South, and to think about the connections between Native and Black individuals. The sources covered look at both material culture (including sculptures by Edmonia Lewis) and texts (such as the abolition narrative of Sophia Pooley) and will demonstrate why it is important to think of the intersection of the African diaspora with Native studies when considering American history. The class will also offer ways to think of primary sources as visual histories, not just illustrations, which can enhance classroom discussions.

This is a two-session master class. In the first session, teachers learn from the master. In the second, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Christian Ayne Crouch is Associate Professor of Historical Studies and Director of American Studies at Bard College. She is the author of the award-winning Nobility Lost: French and Canadian Martial Cultures, Indians, and the End of New France, and her scholarship has delved into the Atlantic military culture, French imperial legacies, and the intersection of Native and African-American history and material culture. Her current book project, Queen Victoria’s Captive: A Story of Ambition, Empire, and a Stolen Ethiopian Prince, reevaluates East African colonial encounters and the human consequences of the world’s most expensive hostage rescue mission.

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