science teacher

Black and white photo of Dr. Max Liborion in front of a microscope

Anti-Colonial Science

with Dr. Max Liboiron
Online
Thursday, January 11, 2021 • Thursday, January 19, 2021
5 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

Anticolonial science questions and transforms underlying assumptions in Western science that stem from imperialism and mastery. Such assumptions are present throughout STEM, from the study of water cycles, to sample gathering, to data entry, and beyond. In this master class, we’ll identify colonial premises and explore how science can be practiced in a manner that foregrounds good land relations, humility, and gratitude.

This is a two-session master class. In the first session, teachers learn from the master. In the second, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Dr. Max Liboiron is associate professor of geography at Memorial University of Newfoundland. She directs the Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research, which develops feminist and anti-colonial methodologies to study marine plastic pollution. Dr. Liboiron has played leading roles in the establishment of the field of Discard Studies (the social study of waste and wasting), the Global Open Science Hardware movement, and is a figure in Indigenous science and technology studies and justice-oriented science.

Virus Evolution

with Paul Turner
Online
Thursday, December 10, • Thursday, December 17, 2020
4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Apply or nominate a worthy colleague here.
Deadline: November 17, 2020.

The current pandemic emphasizes the fact that viruses are always evolving and the importance of understanding how they are driven to emerge in new host species (such as humans). This class will explore virus evolution and the benefits of developing non-harmful viruses for use in disease therapy and other applications.

This is a two-session master class. In the first session, teachers learn from the master. In the second, participants have a rare and valuable opportunity to exchange ideas with other brilliant teachers. Participants are assigned a small amount of homework to prepare for each session.

Paul E. Turner, the Rachel Carson Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University, examines how viruses evolutionarily adapt to overcome new challenges. His laboratory uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate these processes, employing techniques from microbiology, population genetics, genomics, molecular biology, and mathematical modeling. He was a member of the United States delegation at the joint USA-Russia Workshop on Infectious Disease held in Novosibirsk, Russia.

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